Math, Technology

Unit 5: Geometry- More Resources for Flipping!

In this post, I will be sharing resources from our Geometry unit which covers ratios, proportions, area, surface area, volume, and angle relationships.

As a disclaimer, this unit is not organized in a way that you would traditionally see it in a Math 7 classroom.  The class that I teach is aligned to the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) but it is an 7th grade Math Honors course that contains all of the 7th grade standards and the majority of the 8th grade standards.  My goal is to prepare them for Integrated I in their 8th grade year.  One of the 7th grade units that I did not cover this year was Ratios & Proportions, instead, I embedded it throughout the entire year and within several units.  In addition to this, the Geometry that is covered in this unit also embeds 8th grade Math, such as cylinders, cones, and spheres.

If you only teach Math 7 or Math 8, I hope you find some resources that you can use in your classroom and/or modify for your classroom.  It looks like a bizarre unit but, in my case, it totally works!

If you would like to see how I create these Flipped Classroom lessons, please view THIS video on YouTube.

Below are a list of resources that I sharing with you from our Geometry Unit.  Feel free to use, copy, and modify!

5.1 – Ratios & Proportions (Google Slide) (EdPuzzle) (Foldable)

5.2 – Scale Factor (Google Slide) (EdPuzzle) (Foldable)

5.3 – Area of Shapes (Google Slide) (EdPuzzle) (Foldable)

5.4 – Surface Area of 3D Shapes (Google Slide) (EdPuzzle) (Foldable)

5.5 – Volume of 3D Shapes (Google Slide) (EdPuzzle) (Foldable)

5.6 – Angle Relationships (Google Slide) (EdPuzzle) (Foldable)

As a reminder, I have a flipped classroom and created my notes by using Google Slides and Screencastify.  From there, I add the video to EdPuzzle and create questions to check for understanding.  If I see the students struggling, I pull them into small groups to reteach during our “Choice Time” the next day.

If you would like to access the resources from the other Units, you can find them below:

Unit 1: The Number System

Unit 2: Expressions & Equations

Unit 3: Exponents & Roots

Unit 4: Linear Functions & Equations

How to Flip Your Classroom

YouTube Channel

Feel free to leave any questions and/or comments in the comment section below!

6 thoughts on “Unit 5: Geometry- More Resources for Flipping!

  1. Out of curiosity – how long does it take you to create these lessons? Finding time is one big struggle I have heard with teachers creating a flipped classroom!

    1. Such a good question and it is one I am asked frequently. At this point, I have a lot of material built for my Math 7/8 course so not as much time as I did in the beginning.

      When I started flipping the classroom, it would take me a 2-3 hours to build each lesson because I would create the Google Slide and foldable, then record over the Google Slide, upload to EdPuzzle, and input questions. It was definitely a long process but I have received a lot of positive feedback from students and parents.

  2. I am so appreciative of your time, knowledge and expertise of technology in the classroom. I have learned so much. I am at the begining stages of flipping my 6th grade math classroom but can see the positive change already happening with my students.

    I was hoping you could explain in more detail how you implement your whole homework process. Is the foldabe printed for each student or do you have them copy it down, solve and then hand in to you on paper? Is this homework a nightly, weekly, or unit based homework hand in? How often do you check notes from homework to place your students in groups? Also, how do you apply homework credit in your grade book? Do you use both the work they give you, group checking for understanding, and/or Edpuzzle?

    Thank you in advance for any insight you provide, as I strive to find a better structure and flow for the homework aspect of flipping. I am very much obliged!

    1. Hi Tiffany,

      I am so glad that this website has been helpful!

      Those are great questions!

      Is the foldable printed for each student or do you have them copy it down, solve and then hand in to you on paper?

      Students put all of their notes for Math in an interactive notebook (composition book). Unfortunately, our Chromebooks are not touchscreen so I still want them to take notes by hand. The right side is for their notes. If they run out of space, they can add a page extension for more room. The left side is for the foldable – this is their practice problems. I always print the foldables out for them in advance. If they are absent, they can copy it down from the website. These foldables stay in the notebook but the student and I can check whether they got the problem right on EdPuzzle.

      Is this homework a nightly, weekly, or unit based homework hand in?

      Depends. Usually, I do no more than two sets of notes per week.

      How often do you check notes from homework to place your students in groups?

      These notes are due at the end of a two week period which is followed by a short mastery quiz.

      Also, how do you apply homework credit in your grade book?

      I have two grades – INB Notes & Lesson Practice. The INB Notes are based on the Cornell Note Process. Taking the notes is only half of the credit, they also have to add questions and a summary. Lesson Practice is also a grade and this is their “skills practice”. They get two grades for this – a grade for their work and a grade for the number of problems they got correct.

      Do you use both the work they give you, group checking for understanding, and/or Edpuzzle?

      I mainly check the work that they give me. EdPuzzle is just to help sort them into groups for support.

      You might be interested in this YouTube Video on how I flip the classroom: http://www.i-heart-edu.com/four-easy-steps-for-flipping-the-classroom/

      I think it might answer a lot of your questions! Feel free to reach out at [email protected] for more questions. 🙂

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